Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'teaching'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Welcome Center
    • Getting Started
    • New From Neuronline!
    • Help Desk
  • Virtual Events
    • Extended Discussion
    • Event Recaps
    • Live Chats
  • Scientific Research and Training
    • Scientific Research Discussion
    • Neurobiology of Disease Workshop
    • Optogenetics Training Series
    • Program Development
  • Career Discussions
    • Professional Development
    • Career Advice
    • Career Paths
    • Career Stage
  • Diversity
    • Diversity Discussion
    • International Experiences
  • Outreach and Advocacy
    • Outreach and Advocacy Discussion
    • Brain Awareness & Teaching
    • Animals in Research
  • Foundations of Rigorous Neuroscience
    • Foundations of Rigorous Neuroscience
  • COVID-19 Resources
    • Online Learning and Teaching Tools
    • Lab Management and Research
  • Archive
    • SfN Global Connectome: A Virtual Event
    • Archive
    • Past Annual Meetings
  • Support
  • SfN Chapters's Topics
  • Press Conference's Topics

Product Groups

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Found 3 results

  1. Bianca Williams

    April's Neuronline Recap

    Interested in what happened this month on Neuronline? Find the latest advice, discussions, and resources published in April 2022 below. Teaching Neuroscience: Reviving Neuroanatomy Students often find neuroanatomy a daunting exercise of rote memorization in a dead language. Watch this workshop to learn how to make neuroanatomy a more approachable topic and exciting area of focus for students. Genetic Forms of Dementia in a Unique Clinical Setting — The Story of Colombia In this on-demand webinar as a part of the Meet the Experts collection, Kenneth Kosik discusses international research that meshes clinical experience with molecular biology and neurogenetics. This work focuses on the largest kindred of familial Alzheimer’s disease in the world, located in Columbia, and is the basis of a trial for a prevent drug administered before the onset of dementia symptoms. Expanding Diversity in Biomedical Sciences at Historically Black Colleges Melissa Harrington of Delaware State University, a Historically Black institution, has a keen appreciation of the potential for Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to enhance diversity in biomedical sciences. Read and watch as Harrington and Christine Charvet explain the challenges of and potential solutions for enhancing diversity in STEM fields and hear from two students benefiting from DSU’s efforts. Be Prepared to Defend Against Animal Rights Oppositional Efforts Read this recap article of the webinar SfN hosted, How to Prepare for, Defend Against, and Recover from Animal Rights Oppositional Efforts, featuring Katalin Gothard, Eric Nestler, Sharon Juliano, and Matthew Bailey. Due to the sensitivity of the topic, the webinar was not recorded.
  2. Amanda Labuza

    Brain Awareness Week

    Brain Awareness Week 2018 just ended. I hope you had an opportunity to participate. I’d love to hear about the events other groups did. Please share below. For those of you who didn’t hold and event, feel free to live vicariously through my experience. Our BAW event started early morning on Pi Day. Four graduate students piled into a car and filled the trunk with human brains, mini e-phys equipment, and even a few cockroaches. We went to an inner city middle school in Baltimore and took over the science classroom. We started by introducing ourselves and in very basic terms what we study. The classes broke into three stations. The students got to spend time holding fixed human brains and comparing them to mouse and rat brains. We brought slides for them to observe and compare. The second station used the backyard brains spiker box to make a cockroach leg “dance” to music. We used the frequency of the bass to stimulate the nerves in the leg. They learned how we use electrophysiology to study action potentials and record neuronal activity. Finally, they used a simple EMG to control each other’s fingers. They discussed how our bodies use electricity and the principles behind robotic limbs. At the end of each class we saved time to discuss with students careers in science. For many of them, they had never considered anything beyond being a doctor. Many of the students had not considered they could financially afford a PhD versus an MD. The most rewarding part is always seeing a student suddenly realize science is more than just a textbook filled with simplified drawings of complex cells. Hopefully we have inspired some of them to explore their passion for science. picture 1.jpg2048×1536 362 KB Having worked with middle schools, high schools, and elementary schools, we have found middle school is the easiest to work with. Most of the high school students seemed to have already made up their mind and were not interested in changing their plans. The elementary students love the break, but we struggle to think of simple activities that last long enough to keep them occupied. The middle school students were old enough to understand what a neuron was, but young enough to still be open to new ideas. I’m interested in hearing others’ experiences. Which age group do you prefer working with? What activities worked the best for you? Please share your ideas below!
  3. I wanted to share my experiences about the History and Education in Neuroscience or Theme J posters that I visited during SFN and are sometimes overlooked. I received a teaching grant to come to SFN this year and as part I was required to go to the posters pertaining to teaching in neuroscience. I am so glad that I did. There weren’t many viewers over at the posters so I was able to chat with many of the different poster presenters and learn about different techniques and outreach ideas that are out there so I am not “reinventing the wheel” when I want to start something at my current institution as well as great ideas for when I open my own laboratory. For example, I talked to one poster presenter, JA Murray, MMM13 - Game jam with brain bee: steam learning through neuroscience-themed game development. This was a great project where students learned Neuroscience through creating a board game. Then he even manufactured the games so the students had something tangible to take with them. The aspect I really liked about this project, was sure it helped students learn neuroscience but it could be applicable to any discipline. He told me about the most current one that they completed about female literary heroines. The only downside is that these posters seemed as though they were far away from the rest of the “action” and there were black boards in between many of them making the lack of people at these posters look even greater. I’m not sure how you would highlight these better.
×
×
  • Create New...