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  1. Today
  2. My name is Justin Zheng. I am a research assistant at UCSF, and I am planning on attending SFN in person this year. I am looking for a roommate to share the room with from October 5th- October 9th. If you are interested and wanted to discuss further, please feel free to email me. My email is: Justin.zheng2@ucsf.edu
  3. Yicen Zheng

    Looking for a roommate match

    My name is Justin Zheng. I am a research assistant at UCSF, and I am planning on attending SFN in person this year. I am looking for a roommate (Male) to share the room with from October 5th- October 9th. If you are interested and wanted to discuss further, please feel free to email me. My email is: Justin.zheng2@ucsf.edu
  4. Sam Staples

    June Neuronline Recap

    The Postdoctorate Dilemma Hugo Sánchez Castillo shares his journey of finding a postdoctoral position after completing his doctoral studies at the National University of Mexico. He emphasizes that a postdoc is not just an opportunity for scientific growth, but also for building networks, learning about culture, and personal development. Demystifying MATLAB for Beginners In this on-demand webinar, Curtis Neveu will demystify MATLAB for new users and brush up on topics for those who are familiar with the program. Neuroscience and Mental Health in the Amazon Valéria Muoio, a neuroscientist and neurosurgeon at the University of São Paulo and Neuronline Community Leader, describes the important work being done in the Brazilian Amazon rainforest to implement initiatives to help care for and preserve the local inhabitants, as well as the rainforest itself. Meet the ECPAs: Thomas Xin Read the latest Q&A in the “Meet the Early Career Policy Ambassadors” collection. Intracranial Recordings of the Human Orbitofrontal Cortical Activity during Self-Referential Episodic and Valenced Self-Judgments Join this interactive session as Behzad Iravani and Josef Parvizi discuss their paper, “Intracranial Recordings of the Human Orbitofrontal Cortical Activity during Self-Referential Episodic and Valenced Self-Judgments”, with JNeurosci Reviewing Editor Erin Rich.
  5. Last week
  6. Minseon Park

    Looking for a roommate match

    Hi Marianne, I will be in the meeting as well. But I have booked a room with two beds at the Hampton Inn Magnificent Mile from Oct 4 through Oct 9. I would like a female roommate, and I don't mind the room temperature. If you are interested in sharing the room with me, please let me know. Thank you, Minseon Park
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  9. Dear All, I will be in Chicago between October 4 and 10, 2024. Don't hesitate to get in touch with me if you wish to share a room with 2 beds to share the cost. I want to be matched with a female roommate. I feel extremely cold most of the time of the year. I would like to be matched with someone who does not mind keeping the heater on to a high degree. Bests Marianne Monet
  10. Bianca Williams

    JNeurosci Town Hall

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    REGISTER NOW! Questions about submitting to The Journal of Neuroscience, getting more involved with peer review, or scientific publishing as a whole? This town hall is your opportunity to have them answered directly by Editor-in-Chief Sabine Kastner and other members of the JNeurosci Editorial Board. The editors also will cover new journal initiatives, including open peer review, opportunities for early career researchers, and supplementary material. Join live to make sure your specific questions are heard.
  11. Earlier
  12. Jayalakshmi Viswanathan

    Can ChatGPT Revolutionize Neuroscience Education?

    As an author, I see a lot of debate around the use of AI images and chatGPT for writing and illustration purposes, as well as for educational purposes. In my opinion, chatGPT can be an aide for an educator - as a chalkboard might be - a tool with which to convey concepts. Given the issues with data provenance, biases inherent to datasets that can be propagated, and more, I err on the side of caution. When it comes to illustrations for example, in my opinion, hand drawn imagery has an appeal that AI driven CGIs just don't posses - after all, our brains evolved to appreciate art created by the human hand and the beauty in nature. However, AI is here to stay and as it gets better, we can get cleverer at using them in limited use-case scenarios. I also think it can be tremendously helpful in eradicating some language barriers and social determinants of success by helping, say, non-native English speakers understand concepts better with clear explanations available through chatGPT. Having played devil's advocate, I would end with what I started - use AI with caution, and as a tool, but always rely on your own insight and logic in how you use these tools. It is also important to weigh the benefits and harm of using AI for the use case under consideration.
  13. Jayalakshmi Viswanathan

    Are you Attending Neuroscience 2024?

    Yes! I have an Art of Neuroscience booth again this year which I'm very much looking forward to, and will also be presenting a poster! The annual neuroscience conference is usually very nostalgic and even emotional for me. It is an opportunity to meet with friends, old and new, learn about new research, catch up with mentors and students, friends from neuroscience summer schools and grad school etc. One topic that I'm fascinated by is the neuroscience of studying consciousness. Last year, I very much enjoyed the panel, and I'm curious to see if the explosion of AL and ML techniques would have added new avenues to investigate theories of consciousness and big data. This is of course, just a long standing academic curiosity of mine. I am also very much looking forward to seeing topics related to my own research - sensory neuroscience as well as drug discovery and development for AD/ADRD. I love attending the exhibits and learning about new technologies, equipment, and software available to measure, image, and analyze neuronal data from different species. If I could make one suggestion, it would be to emphasize presentations that are rigorous but also those which are espousing values of transparency. I do wish to see more work where scientists are able to openly speak about experiments that disproved the null hypothesis or resulted in pivots in experimental methodologies or goals because the underlying assumptions were incorrect. This would require a change in the research ecosystem as a whole as we shift away from "flashy findings" to "rigorous methodologies" regardless of outcomes. #rigorchampion
  14. Jayalakshmi Viswanathan

    Update us on Your Research!

    Dear fellow neuro-lovers, A few years ago, after my post-doctoral fellowship ended and I was thinking about next steps, I started working in Program Development as a contractor at the National Institute on Aging. While I do not really participate in bench research directly anymore in this capacity, I still do a lot of research and contribute to journal articles (mostly reviews). A big project I work on is trying to address, if you will, the "modifiable" factors to improve the research infrastructure supporting the transition of promising candidate therapeutics through the translational pipeline to the clinic - in other words, overcoming the "valley of death" in translational research. In order to do so, a lot of my research revolves around meta-analyses of the research landscape - how rigorously are studies being conducted? Are they being balanced for sex? Are studies reporting null results as often as they do promising data.... The list goes on. As a curator of the Alzheimer's Preclinical Efficacy Database (AlzPED, https://alzped.nia.nih.gov/), we do this precisely - curate individual article, evaluate them for rigor and reproducibility, and then analyze the reporting patterns as a whole to identify the trends in the research landscape. Our analysis demonstrates that critical elements of rigor are frequently absent from published studies (yes, even from 2023!) which is preventable and diminishes the predictive value of these mostly publicly funded studies. Our focus has been to therefore encourage the research community to adopt principles of rigor, open science and data sharing, and transparent reporting practices to address these modifiable barriers to the discovery of therapeutics for neurodegenerative disorders. I've also been focused on working on several personal research projects of mine. I have been working on my next book, a follow-up to Baby Senses. This has been taking a lot of my time outside of work but I've been excited to pursue this work. I have also been working on developing a suite of educational tools for neuroscience outreach! If you have any questions or comments about my research, I'd be delighted to chat more about it and will be at SfN this year - I look forward to conversations with all of you!
  15. Bianca Williams

    Late Breaking Abstract Submission

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    In order to showcase the most recent and exciting science at Neuroscience 2024, this year SfN is experimenting with holding a second call for abstracts. Late-breaking abstract submission for Neuroscience 2024 will be open Tuesday, July 23–Thursday, August 1. Any SfN member, including those who already submitted an abstract to Neuroscience 2024, can submit a late-breaking abstract. Read the late-breaking abstracts submission rules below, contact your co-authors, and get ready to submit your abstract July 23–August 1. Timeline: July 23: Submissions open August 1, 5 p.m. EDT: Submissions close Late August: Presenting authors notified of abstract acceptance status Early September: Presentation time communicated Details: Posters only (in person, virtual only, or both) Scientific themes A-I only Submissions should report timely, exciting research and will be held to a higher standard of review than regular SfN abstracts No extensions to submission deadline and no editing period — abstracts (including author blocks) must be final by August 1, 5 p.m. EDT Grouped by theme in the Late-Breaking Abstracts Posters section on the poster floor Submissions are subject to SfN’s nonrefundable $165 abstract submission fee
  16. Hugo Sanchez-Castillo

    Update us on Your Research!

    Hello scienmigos!!! We are involved in participation of the periacueductal gray matter in the alcohol intake, we expecting the publication of this paper soon: Involvement of NPY-Y1 receptors in periaqueductal gray on anxiety, and food, sucrose, and alcohol consumption in pre-exposed Wistar rats We are studing the differential particiaption of the mGlur1 and mGlur5 glutamatergic receptors in males and females after chronic stress. Almost done, besides we are doing some timing research with stress and immediate time perception. And finally Im actualizing my social skills and popular knowledge watching famous tv series!! (I didnt see any for many years)
  17. valeria muoio

    Update us on Your Research!

    I'm involved in the last two months in 2 new projects The first, we are developing 3D printing models for motor training in children with cerebral palsy . We are working together with the engineering school to develop inexpensive and effective models that can be offered in low-income regions. The second is that we are studying motor neuron recruitment in children before and after neurostimulation procedures (invasive and non-invasive). We want to quantify neuronal density and activity and correlate it with motor improvement Both projects end up complementing each other and I hope that by the end of this year we will be observing the results of these protocols
  18. Daisy Gallardo

    Can ChatGPT Revolutionize Neuroscience Education?

    Jasmine brings up a great point in terms of taking advantage of what Chat GPT has to offer and how helpful it can be in aiding educators. I agree that its use should be supplementary, but I believe it should primarily be used by educators rather than students. Educators can benefit from rephrasing complex ideas into simpler, more understandable concepts. Students, however, may rely too heavily on Chat GPT, which could prevent them from fully understanding the topic. In my experience, creating summaries or study guides helps me actively engage with the material and retain the information more efficiently. Therefore, using Chat GPT for tasks that bypass active engagement would detract from the students' learning experience.
  19. until
    Register for Intracranial Recordings of the Human Orbitofrontal Cortical Activity during Self-Referential Episodic and Valenced Self-Judgments by selecting the following link. Join this interactive session as Behzad Iravani and Josef Parvizi discuss their paper, “Intracranial Recordings of the Human Orbitofrontal Cortical Activity during Self-Referential Episodic and Valenced Self-Judgments”, with JNeurosci Reviewing Editor Erin Rich. Attendees can submit questions at registration and live during the webinar. Below is the significance statement of the paper published March 13, 2024, in JNeurosci and authored by Behzad Iravani, Neda Kaboodvand, James R. Stieger, Eugene Y. Liang, Zoe Lusk, Peter Fransson, Gayle K. Deutsch, Ian H. Gotlib, and Josef Parvizi. In direct recordings from the human brain, we observed significant responses characterized by high-frequency activity, aka high gamma, in distinct populations of the orbital (oPFC) and ventromedial (vmPFC) regions of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC)—corresponding to the location of the resting-state limbic network and to a lesser extent default mode network—when human subjects were engaged in self-referential episodic memory retrieval and self-trait judgments. Notably, simultaneous recordings across the two OFC regions in the same individuals revealed earlier activations in vmPFC than oPFC, indicating that the two subregions are involved in different stages of self-referential thought processes. Lastly, in individuals with high depressive symptoms, the OFC responses were significantly reduced during positive self-judgments but not heightened during negative self-evaluations.
  20. My Experience as a Deaf Person in Science Watch this video as PhD student Melody Schwenk talks of growing up Deaf to now researching language and cognition at Gallaudet University. Hostile Attribution Bias Shapes Neural Synchrony in the Left Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex during Ambiguous Social Narratives In this on-demand webinar, Yizhou Lyu, Zishan Su, and Yuan Chang Leong discuss their paper with JNeurosci Reviewing Editor Daniela Schiller. Meet the ECPAs: Claire Robey Read the latest Q&A in the “Meet the Early Career Policy Ambassadors” collection. Replicability and Preregistration Watch this on-demand webinar moderated by eNeuro Editor-in-Chief Christophe Bernard, joined by Jose Abisambra, co-Editor-in-Chief of Brain Research, and Randall Ellis, postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School. How to Plan and Execute Outreach Events with Broad Appeal Read this article if you are interested in neuroscience outreach and science communication with the general public.
  21. Sai Lavanya Patnala

    Can ChatGPT Revolutionize Neuroscience Education?

    I fully agree with Jasmine's perspective on ChatGPT, considering it as a supplemental tool and being mindful of its limitations. It's important to acknowledge that it cannot override human cognition. I was excited to learn about its potential application as a learning tool in neuroscience education, where it can simplify complex concepts and personalize information to match an individual's comprehension. In my personal experience with using ChatGPT as a writing tool, I've found it to help improve my efficiency. However, the output is not always accurate, and I've noticed several instances where the prompts are misunderstood. Therefore, I see ChatGPT as a helpful supplement to enhance human work efficiency, but I don't believe it can replace the actual human brain. I agree that AI tools can enhance learning efficiency, but we should be cautious about potential misuse, as Hugo mentioned.
  22. Hugo Sanchez-Castillo

    Can ChatGPT Revolutionize Neuroscience Education?

    Chispas!!! (is an Spanish word that mean sparkles and is used for exclamation). Hard topic because Im a huge fan of the AI, but my experience with the ChatGTP is not so good. The reason is that, there is many uses that we were did not aware for it. For example making presentations without knowledge, writing homework without read the paper or the book chapter, write paragraphs without understand the source of the information, etc. However I believe that is not the fault of ChatGPT, is matter that we were not prepared for that, we didn't had regulations, or discussions about the use or abuse of this program. When I read the article of Jasmine I realize that is work is HUGE. Because she is doing something and she said something that I agreed with her: ChatGPT is a tool!!!... We need to make serious discussions about the use, not only between scientists, but students and professionals. Because the science needs the technology and take advance from that. But the technology can't replace the researcher, the writer or the student. As teachers, we evaluated the students not the functioning of ChatGPT, when one student give us a paper written entirely with ChatGPT we are evaluating the program not the person. Cheers
  23. Hugo Sanchez-Castillo

    Are you Attending Neuroscience 2024?

    Hello my dear neurotravellers!!! SO EXCITED!!! For me, the SFN meeting is like christmas!!! Full of joy and gifts, science and friends... My lab works with stress right now, for this reason I'm hoping for stress related topics, as the interleukins activates under certain stress conditions, the affectation of the Prefrontal Cortex in the astrocytic population, the new advances in trauma with humans... I think that stress and trauma is one of the most challenging diseases due the great affectation that produces in the brain. There is changes at cellular, molecular, structural, behavioral. Other huge reason is the stress and trauma is also present in children's, elder people, adults... everybody. Sad but true... But don't be sad, because whereas there is science, always it will be a chance of getting better. I see there neurotravellers
  24. Daisy Gallardo

    Are you Attending Neuroscience 2024?

    There is always a surplus of interesting topics at SfN, and it never feels like I have enough time to learn about them all. One of the popular topics I'm looking forward to hearing about is the work being done on the mTOR pathway in the context of aging and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). The mTOR pathway has been studied extensively in relation to AD and aging, with most studies focusing on mTOR inhibition as a neuroprotective method since it promotes autophagy. I'm particularly curious to learn about the research being done on the opposite –mTOR activation– in the context of AD and aging. I'm also excited to learn about the ongoing clinical research on Alzheimer's disease and the development of Late-onset AD mouse models.
  25. Sai Lavanya Patnala

    Are you Attending Neuroscience 2024?

    As someone with a more clinical background, I am excited to learn the latest research developments concerning the microenvironment of neurological disorders. One topic that I have recently been reading more about is Alzheimer's disease and other Tauopathies. I also recently learned about the racial differences in biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease. I believe that research in this field is ever-evolving and can change the trajectory of how the disease is detected and treated. I want to know more about the latest scientific research on Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. Another topic that interests me is Monoclonal antibodies In my last few months of clinical experience in the US, I have noticed the use of MABs in managing several conditions, especially in autoimmune conditions like Myasthenia Gravis and how the use of such newer modalities changed the disease course and improved outcomes for several patients. I would like to see the latest advancements in autoimmune research and learn how they can be clinically relevant.
  26. valeria muoio

    Are you Attending Neuroscience 2024?

    I chose three of my favorite topics: I would like to see panels or symposia with alternatives to experimental in vivo models. Such as organoids, cell cultures, computer and artificial intelligence programs. Although it is still necessary, I hope that in the future we will use fewer and fewer animals in experimental models. I'd love to see translational science panels, of how current research is translating into real-world applications. I find it very interesting to witness the outline of a research project, the mistakes and successes, the corrections and finally the possibilities of application in real patients. And finally, there's I'd like to see research into new technologies on brain-machine interface, not just because it's in vogue. There is a very great need for the development of such technologies to improve the quality of human life, and many ambitious projects like Neuralink are still very elusive. I believe that we should democratize more and discuss more about the knowledge that involves this field of research.
  27. Just want you to know that I saw your message. -Paul
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