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  4. Michael Oberdorfer

    Speaking scientific truth to power.

    The Washington Post reports that Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases at NIH, is facing threats because his scientific opinions, on the need for continued social-distancing, the time needed for vaccine development, testing candidates for therapeutic agents, among others in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, have contradicted those of the President. These threats have prompted HHS Secretary Alex Azar to provide a security detail for Fauci, Reports of these threats emerged earlier when a number of internet forums, newscasts and commentators supported the President when he appeared to take issue with the advice of medical and scientific experts on the pandemic. Comments?
  5. Earlier
  6. Michael Oberdorfer

    Fetal Tissue Research and COVID-19

    The gravity of the COVID-19 pandemic and the need to mobilize all avenues of research have prompted more than 100 professional societies, universities and research centers to call for an end to the administration's ban on fetal tissue research. In a letter to the administration, these scientific organizations say that this restriction may contribute to delays for potential treatments. Eric Anthony, director of policy at the International Society for Stem Cell Research, states in part: “We believe that researchers should have all of the biomedical research tools out there to develop treatments for COVID-19,” Your thoughts?
  7. In an effort to provide opportunities to the scientific community during these challenging times, the Office of Intramural Training and Education at the NIH will be offering a series of webinars in the coming weeks. Use this link to register for the first online session:https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/640637452789607693 Join us to discuss strategies for building resilience in this time of stress and uncertainty. Topics covered include shifting and rebuilding routines, dealing with loneliness and distance from our support networks, balancing demands of family and work, news coverage overload, and handling uncertainty and worry about our science, educational and career goals.
  8. until
    In an effort to provide opportunities to the scientific community during these challenging times, the Office of Intramural Training and Education at the NIH will be offering a series of webinars in the coming weeks. Use this link to register for the first online session:https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/640637452789607693 Join us to discuss strategies for building resilience in this time of stress and uncertainty. Topics covered include shifting and rebuilding routines, dealing with loneliness and distance from our support networks, balancing demands of family and work, news coverage overload, and handling uncertainty and worry about our science, educational and career goals.
  9. Go to https://mdcune.psych.ucla.edu/ We have developed and field tested digital labs for undergrads. They are inquiry based and NOT cookbook. These labs are provided to the community for free via a website that was originally funded by NSF. Faculty will need to request an account to get to grading keys, paper rubrics, etc. William (Bill) Grisham UCLA
  10. KathiaRamirez

    How will COVID-19 impact your research?

    Hi, I work from Mexico City, we still are in phase 1 but we are taking precautions. Our local authorities (at the Institute) suggested that, starting this week, only 4 people/lab are permited. So, as we work with rodents, we had to diminish the mice populations and cut down some experiments. It was hard because we had to priorized, but our PI encouraged us to work in our papers and thesis at home.
  11. Let us know what you're up to if you're on extended telework and away from the lab!
  12. Gabriella Panuccio

    How will COVID-19 impact your research?

    No, no issues with enthusiasm, luckily. We all die hard and are super driven!!! Same thing for my EU collabs.
  13. Hugo Sanchez-Castillo

    How will COVID-19 impact your research?

    I work from Mexico and here the situation is no so bad (yet). We have the phase 1 activated, that means that we are only worried about precautions and to report if there s some symptomatology. However if the phase increases to 3 the university it will be close and the online activities it will be mandatory not optional. In the research field, we have more or less the same situation, however the research it will not shut down.
  14. Andrew Chen

    How will COVID-19 impact your research?

    @Gabriella Panuccio good to hear from you and thank you for sharing your experience! I've been reading a lot on how Italy is approaching this situation and appreciate you giving us your perspective on how you are approaching it in this difficult time. How are your lab members and collaborators doing? I hope that morale hasn't been dampened too much. @Stephanie Vose thanks for sharing that resource. That's really nice that NIH is addressing these impacts.
  15. Stephanie Vose

    How will COVID-19 impact your research?

    The NIH posted this announcement: General Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) - Proposal Submission and Award Management Related to COVID-19 https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-20-083.html
  16. Gabriella Panuccio

    How will COVID-19 impact your research?

    I live in Italy and the situation is worrying. Schools and Universities have been closed for quite a long time now. And the latest news is the mandatory shut down of all the places for social gatherings, like pubs and restaurants. I work in a research institution, which is still open according to the latest directions. But we're implementing teleworking since the very beginning. My lab is still standing, but yesterday I had to schedule an extraordinary lab meeting to establish a calendar of the crucial activities that can't be stopped nor postponed. This is a time when it comes to make important choices on who is working to get results and who's not. Luckily, at least for now, the activities in my lab are not so affected. We can safely work the minimum necessary to keep the lab activities going even if in idle mode.
  17. @Amanda Labuza, one of our Community leaders, wrote up a great article on a Meet-the-Expert session from the 2019 meeting! https://neuronline.sfn.org/professional-development/discovering-your-questions-as-a-scientist-by-listening
  18. until
    The goal of this virtual conference is to educate trainees and inform new entrants into the field about the opportunities and challenges of epigenetics research in neurobiology. We aim both to introduce major concepts in this field and to discuss exciting new research findings. We will highlight specific, integrative stories that show how the application of methods and concepts from the field of epigenetics can advance understanding of neurobiological questions. The program will comprise four one-hour sessions that move from the foundations to the future of the field. More information on sessions and registration can be found here.
  19. It's no news that the COVID-19 virus has many institutions concerned about public health and safety. Many schools and universities around the world are thinking about switching to remote classes or even shutting down schools to minimize the risk of transmission. Unfortunately, many biological researchers do not have the option of teleworking because they have animal colonies and cell lines to care for, not to mention time-sensitive experiments. How are you preparing for these situations in case of mandatory closures?
  20. Thanks for joining us today, everyone! And thank you @John Davenport and @Saskia DeVries for taking time out of your busy days to answer all these questions! Please fill out the survey in the first post of this thread, your feedback is valuable for us to improve the FRN program!
  21. Thanks so much for all your questions - I’ve enjoyed this conversation!
  22. Thanks everyone for your great questions. I hope you will all be able to successfully navigate collaboration and team science as part of your careers.
  23. Good question! I don’t know that there’s a single strategy, but I think there are a couple of important pieces. First, being able to very clearly communicate your unique contributions to the team project. Second, having a clear vision for what you will do in your academic lab. I think making sure these two things are well communicated by both the applicant and by their references is critical.
  24. I agree that data sharing is a challenge. This is a case where some "top down" decisions about how a team will operate can be helpful. A democratic discussion might result in every lab continuing to do their own thing -- but setting some ground rules can provide structure-- for instance, that a lab must use a particular format or data sharing platform in order to be part of a larger collaboration. One driver of this is and will continue to be funding agencies who are increasingly dictating data science structures and data sharing as explicit parts of collaborative grants.
  25. And also, does it mean that if you were able to publish a paper in a highly cited or well-respected journal publications makes your research rigorous and reliable? Is it really necessary to go that path when it comes to publishing papers? It is because my PI mentioned that he knows of a Professor who is so established and known in his field that he doesn't really care in publishing his papers or works in a well-respected journals but still gets cited by other PIs in their own research. In fact, nowadays, that Professor publishes his works and papers in journals with lesser impact to help the journal publication gain considerations. Anonymous poster hash: 2a8db...839
  26. This is a big challenge - both for collaborations and for open science. I do think moving towards more standardized file formats is valuable here, but even when it’s not completely possible, we can move in that direction. When I was in graduate school working on my solitary project, every experiment data file was structured slightly differently from the others. It was mayhem. So at a minimum, consistency within a project is a required, and robust meta-data and documentation is extremely important for other collaborators to be able to use the data. Communicating and planning how this will be done needs to happen up front. But, big picture, I think this is something that needs to be addressed by the larger field as we move toward more and more data sharing, even outside of collaborations. We need better infrastructure and standards that enable data to be shared and re-used meaningfully.
  27. It's a really good question. I can't comment on this specific example, but in any situation any participant in a team will have information they are willing to share and information they want to keep private--perhaps with good reason. It can be helpful at the beginning of a collaboration to discuss with all members what information they are expected to share to be a part of the team. They shouldn't be expected to share everything, but it's not unreasonable to expect everyone to share openly information that's relevant to the success of the project.
  28. User submitted question: "How do you get back to the more traditional academic lab setting after working for an institute like the Allen Institute for Brain Science?"
  29. I agree that it's the responsibility of the project leaders as well as project managers, to instill good practices in rigor and reproducibility. Project managers are in a good position to identify data or experimental practices that don't meet good standards -- but they may not feel comfortable or have the authority to confront a member of the team. I've mentioned this in a couple of replies and I'll mention again -- teams should also look for institutional training and resources that can help with this very important component to science. Your efforts will have more traction if your team guidelines are in line with your institutional guidelines, or, for instance, guidelines of important journals.
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