Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'music'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Welcome Center
    • Getting Started
    • New From Neuronline!
    • Neuroscience 2022
    • History of the Society for Neuroscience
    • Help Desk
  • Virtual Events
    • Extended Discussion
    • Event Recaps
    • Live Chats
  • Scientific Research and Training
    • Scientific Research Discussion
    • Optogenetics Training Series
    • Program Development
  • Career Discussions
    • Professional Development
    • Career Advice
    • Career Paths
    • Career Stage
  • Diversity
    • Diversity Discussion
    • International Experiences
  • Outreach and Advocacy
    • Outreach and Advocacy Discussion
    • Brain Awareness & Teaching
    • Animals in Research
  • Foundations of Rigorous Neuroscience
    • Foundations of Rigorous Neuroscience
  • Support
  • SfN Chapters's Topics
  • Press Conference's Topics

Product Groups

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Found 2 results

  1. pizbicki

    Sound Health

    I am so thrilled that the NIH is promoting the importance of music and medicine. If you have any interest in this topic, here are a few links: National Institutes of Health (NIH) Sound Health Music can get you moving, lift your mood, and even help you recall a memory, but can it improve your health? Through a new partnership, the National Institutes of Health and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts will expand on an... https://www.nih.gov/sound-health/music-mind-event (Videos of the lectures are each event.) http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/06/02/530879198/the-soprano-and-the-scientist-a-conversation-about-music-and-medicine (Short NPR interview.)
  2. Here is a study exemplifying the importance of the intersection of music, medicine, and neuroscience. ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Therapeutic singing as an early intervention for swallowing in persons with Parkinson's disease. EL Stegemöller, P Hibbing, H Radig and J Wingate, Complementary therapies in medicine, Apr 2017 For persons with Parkinson's disease (PD), secondary motor symptoms such as swallow impairment impact the quality of life and are major contributors to mortality. There is a present need for therapeutic interventions aimed at improving swallow function during the early stages of PD. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the effects of a group therapeutic singing intervention on swallowing in persons with PD with no significant dysphagia symptoms.Cohort study.University in the United States.Twenty-four participants with PD.Eight weeks of group therapeutic singing.Electromyography (EMG) was used to assess muscle activity associated with swallow pre and post the group singing intervention. Swallow quality of life (SWAL-QOL) and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) were also obtained pre- and post-intervention.Participants reported minimal difficulty with swallowing, yet results revealed a significant increase in EMG outcome measures, as well as significant improvement in UPDRS total and UPDRS motor scores. No significant differences were revealed for SWAL-QOL.Increases in EMG timing measures may suggest that group singing results in the prolongation of laryngeal elevation, protecting the airway from foreign material for longer periods of time during swallow. Combined with the improvement in UPDRS clinical measures, therapeutic singing may be an engaging early intervention strategy to address oropharyngeal dysphagia while also benefiting additional clinical symptoms of PD. “For persons with Parkinson’s disease (PD), secondary motor symptoms such as swallow impairment impact the quality of life and are major contributors to mortality. There is a present need for therapeutic interventions aimed at improving swallow function during the early stages of PD. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the effects of a group therapeutic singing intervention on swallowing in persons with PD with no significant dysphagia symptoms. Cohort study was the University in the United States. Twenty-four participants with PD. Eight weeks of group therapeutic singing. Electromyography (EMG) was used to assess muscle activity associated with swallow pre and post the group singing intervention. Swallow quality of life (SWAL-QOL) and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) were also obtained pre- and post-intervention. Participants reported minimal difficulty with swallowing, yet results revealed a significant increase in EMG outcome measures, as well as significant improvement in UPDRS total and UPDRS motor scores. No significant differences were revealed for SWAL-QOL. Increases in EMG timing measures may suggest that group singing results in the prolongation of laryngeal elevation, protecting the airway from foreign material for longer periods of time during swallow. Combined with the improvement in UPDRS clinical measures, therapeutic singing may be an engaging early intervention strategy to address oropharyngeal dysphagia while also benefiting additional clinical symptoms of PD.”
×
×
  • Create New...