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  1. The Black Lives Matter Movement sparked a worldwide response indicating these issues have broad impact. On July 2, SfN hosted a webinar called, “Black Lives Matter and Neuroscience: Why This Moment Matters.” During the webinar, panelists Nii Addy, PhD, Marguerite Matthews, PhD, and Fitzroy ‘Pablo’ Wickham spoke about the challenges that diverse neuroscientists face within the field and provided guidance on how the neuroscience community can leverage this moment to influence change. Join SfN and the panelists Friday, September 4 from 1 – 2 p.m. EDT as they continue their conversation and take additional questions within the Neuronline Community forum. Neuroscience is stronger with diverse perspectives and neuroscientists of all backgrounds are encouraged to attend and contribute to the live discussion. Those who are not able to attend are encouraged to post questions in this discussion thread in advance of the live event and read through the discussion at a later date. Nii Addy, PhD Nii Addy is an associate professor of psychiatry and of cellular and molecular physiology at Yale School of Medicine. He received his B.S. in biology from Duke University and his PhD in neuroscience from Yale University. Addy directs a federally funded research program investigating the neurobiological bases of substance abuse, depression and anxiety. Addy’s team also studies the ability of tobacco product flavor additives to alter nicotine use behavior and addiction. He contributes to graduate student and postdoctoral training, faculty mentoring, and diversity, equity and inclusion programs and initiatives through his work on campus and his work in professional scientific societies. Marguerite Matthews, PhD Marguerite Matthews is a health program specialist in the office of programs to enhance neuroscience workforce diversity at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Matthews received her B.S. in biochemistry from Spelman College and her PhD in neuroscience from the University of Pittsburgh. She completed her postdoctoral fellowship in behavioral neuroscience at the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU), where she also served as program director for the Youth Engaged in Science (YES!) outreach initiative, and program director for the OHSU Fellowship for Diversity in Research Program to recruit and retain postdoctoral researchers from underrepresented backgrounds. As a program specialist, Matthews supports NINDS diversity initiatives and programs that provide neuroscience research training and career development for students and early career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds. Matthews is a former participant in the Neuroscience Scholars Program and currently serves as a mentor. Fitzroy Wickham Fitzroy ‘Pablo’ Wickham is a Jamaican-born Wesleyan undergraduate double majoring in neuroscience and theater with a minor in chemistry. Wickham is a research assistant in the Naegele Lab at the Wesleyan University conducting stem cell research to treat temporal lobe epilepsy in mice. On campus, he serves as a head resident for Residential Life, senior class president, and an honor board/community standards board member. He is involved in student theater, mock trial, and the Jamaican Heritage Club, YAADI. His aspirations are to become a neurosurgeon, researcher, and actor. Please remember to follow the Digital Learning Community Guidelines here when participating in the Live Chat.
  2. Research team leaders Kip Ludwig and Lique Coolen will be live in the Neuronline Community to engage in a discussion and answer questions about challenges and opportunities for enhancing and maintaining scientific rigor during shut-downs and re-opening of research laboratories and publishing in the times of a pandemic. A recent Neuronline article sets the stage, but the discussion will be broader as all community input is invited and encouraged. This live chat is part of the Foundations of Rigorous Neuroscience Research (FRN) program. Post a question in this thread during the Live Chat for Kip and Lique to answer, or post ahead of time if you can't make it! Meet the live chat hosts: Kip Ludwig, PhD Kip Ludwig leads the Ludwig Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, specializing in neuromodulation, bioelectronic medicine, and electroceutical devices. The lab’s primary focus is to develop minimally invasive, next-generation neuromodulation therapies to hack the nervous system, treat circuit dysfunction, and deliver biomolecules precisely to target areas. Ludwig previously served as the Program Director for Neural Engineering at the NIH. He co-led the Translational Devices Program at the NINDS, led NIH BRAIN Initiative programs to catalyze implantable academic and clinical devices, and led a trans-NIH planning team to develop the S.P.A.R.C. Program - stimulating advances in neuromodulation therapies for organ systems. Lique Coolen, PhD Lique Coolen is an associate dean and a professor of biological sciences at Kent State University. She previously served as faculty at the University of Mississippi, University of Cincinnati, University of Western Ontario, and University of Michigan. Coolen earned her PhD from the University of Nijmegen in the Netherlands. We are evaluating this program at every step and rely on your input and feedback to improve! At the end of the live chat, please fill out the survey below.
  3. until
    Research team leaders Kip Ludwig and Lique Coolen will be live in the Neuronline Community to engage in a discussion and answer questions about challenges and opportunities for enhancing and maintaining scientific rigor during shut-downs and re-opening of research laboratories and publishing in the times of a pandemic. A recent Neuronline article sets the stage, but the discussion will be broader as all community input is invited and encouraged. This live chat is part of the Foundations of Rigorous Neuroscience Research (FRN) program. Join the Live Chat here
  4. UPDATE: This live chat has already ended, but please read the discussion, and feel free to leave a comment! Join John Davenport and Saskia de Vries, Neuroscience 2019 workshop presenters, for a live chat on Thursday, February 13, 2020 from 2-3 pm EST. Drs. Davenport and de Vries will facilitate an online discussion opportunity for you to share your experiences and ideas related to collaboration, pros and cons of interdisciplinary research projects, and consequences of team science for individuals and institutions. This live chat is part of the Foundations of Rigorous Neuroscience Research (FRN) program, and is open to all. Reply to this topic below with your questions (anonymously or not) either before the live chat or during the event for John and Saskia to answer! You can also submit questions using this form: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/FRNlivechat20. Meet the live chat facilitators: Saskia de Vries, PhD Saskia de Vries is an assistant investigator at the Allen Institute for Brain Science. De Vries studies visual physiology and led the creation of the Allen Brain Observatory, a large-scale survey of visual physiological responses in the mouse cortex. She received her BS in molecular biophysics and biochemistry from Yale University and her PhD in neurobiology from Harvard University, and completed postdoctoral training at Stanford University. R. John Davenport, PhD John Davenport is the managing director of the Robert J. and Nancy D. Carney Institute for Brain Science and an adjunct associate professor of neuroscience at Brown University. As a science journalist, his work has appeared in Science, Newsweek, Wired, the HHMI Bulletin, and other venues. He joined Science magazine as an associate editor for the Science of Aging Knowledge Environment, covering developments in the field of biology of aging. Davenport earned his PhD in chemistry (molecular biology) from the University of Oregon and brings together his research background and experience in communication to serve as a liaison among the more than 180 faculty members at Brown who pursue research on the brain. He catalyzes communication and scientific collaboration among diverse disciplines, particularly the intersection of the physical and life sciences, and works with teams of scientists to build and sustain interdisciplinary research and training programs. We are evaluating this program at every step and rely on your input and feedback to improve! At the end of the live chat, please fill out the survey below.
  5. until
    Neuroscience 2019 workshop presenters John Davenport and Saskia de Vries will be live in the Neuronline Community to answer questions and discuss how to navigate collaborative research projects for both individuals and neuroscience programs. This live chat is part of the Foundations of Rigorous Neuroscience Research (FRN) program. Save the date: Thursday, February 13th, 2-3PM EST. Log into the Neuronline Community and follow the thread to be notified when the thread goes live! Live Chat Thread:
  6. Join Os Steward and Lique Coolen – leaders of SfN’s Foundations of Rigorous Neuroscience Research (FRN) program for a live virtual town hall, September 19, 2019 from 1-2 pm EDT. Drs. Steward and Coolen will facilitate an online discussion opportunity for you to share your experiences and ideas related to enhancing a research culture that supports scientific rigor. They can also answer your questions about FRN and collect your suggestions about what topics and speakers the training program should include. Reply to this topic below with your questions either before the town hall or during the event for Os and Lique to answer! Meet the FRN program’s Co-PI’s: Oswald Steward, PhD Oswald Steward is founding director of the Reeve-Irvine Research Center for Spinal Cord Injury at the University of California, Irvine. He is Reeve-Irvine Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology and holds additional joint appointments in the departments of neurobiology and behavior and neurosurgery. His research focuses on how neurons create and maintain their connections, how synapses are modified by experience and injury, and the role of genes in neuronal regeneration, growth, and function. He received his PhD in psychobiology/neuroscience from the University of California, Irvine. Lique Coolen, PhD Lique Coolen is a professor of biological sciences and associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Kent State University. Most recently, she was a professor of physiology and neurobiology and associate dean for postdoctoral studies at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Her research focuses on the neural basis for social behavior and endocrine function, as well as spinal reflexes with the goal to develop new treatments for spinal cord injury. Coolen earned her PhD in neuroscience from the University of Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. We are evaluating this program at every step and rely on your input and feedback to improve! At the end of the Live Chat, please fill out the survey below.
  7. until
    Join Os Steward and Lique Coolen – leaders of SfN’s Foundations of Rigorous Neuroscience Research (FRN) program for a live virtual town hall, September 19, 2019 from 1-2 pm EDT. Drs. Steward and Coolen will facilitate an online discussion opportunity for you to share your experiences and ideas related to enhancing a research culture that supports scientific rigor. They can also answer your questions about FRN and collect your suggestions about what topics and speakers the training program should include. Check out the town hall and submit your questions and comments either before the town hall or during the event for Os and Lique to answer!
  8. sh79

    Abstract submission

    Hi, if is the figure caption is added as in image to the document, does it still count as the number of characters? because word doesn’t consider count the number of characters or words in the caption.
  9. Andrew Chen

    Abstract Submission 2019 Live Chat

    Join the Abstract Submission Live Chat | Monday, April 29, 11a.m.-12 p.m. EDT Do you have any questions about submitting an abstract for Neuroscience 2019? Join us on April 29 for an online discussion on the Neuronline Community with Cheryl Stucky, PhD and Patricia Janak, PhD, Chair of the Program Committee. Don’t miss your chance to chat about your submission directly with abstract reviewers! Participants are encouraged to submit questions in advance of the live chat in the discussion thread below. If you would like to post a question but are unable to do so directly in this thread, please email program@sfn.org with your question. Related Resources: Submit abstracts at http://www.sfn.org/cfa Discussion Moderators Patricia Janak, PhD Patricia Janak is a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor at Johns Hopkins University, with appointments in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and the Department of Neuroscience in the School of Medicine. Patricia studies neural processes of reward learning, and is especially interested in learning mechanisms underlying addiction. Patricia earned her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, and conducted postdoctoral research at the Wake Forest School of Medicine and the National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health. From 1999 to 2014, Dr. Janak was faculty at the University of California, San Francisco where she was the Howard J. Weinberger, M.D., Endowed Chair in Addiction Research at the University of California, San Francisco. Cheryl Stucky, PhD Cheryl Stucky is the Marvin Wagner Endowed Chair at the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW). She is also Director of the Neuroscience Doctoral Program and Director of the Pain Division of the Neuroscience Research Center at MCW. Cheryl studies the molecular, cellular and physiological mechanisms of somatosensation, particularly processes underlying touch transduction and acute and chronic pain. Cheryl received her BA from Bethel College in Newton, Kansas. She then earned her Ph.D. in Neuroscience at the University of Minnesota and conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Würzburg in Würzburg, Germany and the Max Delbruck Center for Molecular Medicine in Berlin, Germany. She is currently PI on two R01 grants and an R37 Javits award from NINDS.
  10. Live Chat: Technical Considerations for Optogenetic Experiments Thursday, August 16, 1–2 p.m. EDT Learn the key technical issues that arise in the design and interpretation of optogenetics experiments in Module 7 of the Optogenetics Training Series. After reviewing the Module 7 materials, submit questions from August 1 – August 16 to the Module 7 faculty in the discussion thread below. On Thursday, August 16, from 1–2 p.m. EDT, they will answer your questions live right here in the Community. You may also email your questions to digitallearning@sfn.org. Live Chat Facilitators Chris Chen Scott Owen Julia Lemos Visit the rest of the Optogenetics Training Series forum for all eight modules to share your insights and best practices, ask questions, and engage with other training series’ participants. If you are unable to log in, you can email your questions for the facilitators to digitallearning@sfn.org.
  11. Neurobiology of Disease Webinar and Live Chat | July 12, 2018 If you receive an error message after logging in, please refresh your browser and try to log in again a few times to override the error. Advances in gene therapy have propelled the field into the clinical realm, and new medical treatment options are beginning to offer help in neurological diseases long thought to be incurable. In this webinar on July 12, select faculty from the 2017 Neurobiology of Disease Workshop will continue the discussion on: Gene targeted therapies for spinal muscular atrophy. Gene addition in hematopoietic stem-cells for leukodystrophies. Adeno-associated virus gene delivery for neurological disease. After the scientific presentations, join the speakers @csumner1 @miguel.esteves @breakefield in the replies below for a live chat. Feel free to leave your questions in the Neuronline Community in advance of the live chat. * Register now Watch the Webinar: July 12, 1:00 p.m. EDT Join the Live Chat: July 12, 1:45 p.m. EDT Can’t attend live? Register to watch on-demand. *Current and inactive SfN members log in using SfN.org information. non-SfN members create a new account. In the live chat: Charlotte Sumner, PhD Charlotte J. Sumner is a professor of neurology and neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Miguel Sena Esteves, PhD Miguel Sena Esteves is an associate professor in the department of neurology at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Xandra O. Breakefield, PhD Xandra O. Breakefield is a professor in the department of neurology at Harvard Medical School and a geneticist in neurology and radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital. Link back to webinar
  12. aabdullah

    Abstract Submission Live Chat

    Join the Abstract Submission Live Chat | Wednesday, April 18, 2-3 p.m. EDT Do you have any burning questions about submitting an abstract for Neuroscience 2018? Join us on April 18 for an online discussion on Neuronline with Kang Shen, Chair of the Program Committee, and Ellen Lumpkin, Theme D Chair of the Program Committee. Don’t miss your chance to chat directly with abstract reviewers! Participants are encouraged to submit questions in advance of the live chat in the discussion thread below. Related Resources: https://community.sfn.org/t/about-the-abstract-topic-matching-forum-category/279 Submit abstracts at http://www.sfn.org/cfa Facilitators image.jpg2010×2514 853 KB Kang Shen, PhD Kang Shen is a professor of neuronal cell biology in the department of biology at Stanford University. He is also an investigator in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Kang’s research focuses on the dendrite morphogenesis, neuronal polarization and synapse formation. He earned his Bachelor of Medicine degree from Tongji Medical University from China, his Ph. D. degree from Duke University and completed postdoctoral training from the University of California San Francisco. image.jpg960×1185 224 KB Ellen A Lumpkin, PhD Ellen A. Lumpkin is an associate professor of physiology & cellular biophysics and of somatosensory biology (in dermatology) at Columbia University. She is also Co-Director of the Thompson Family Foundation Initiative in Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy & Sensory Neuroscience. She previously was a Sandler Fellow in the department of physiology at UC San Francisco and an assistant professor of neuroscience, physiology & molecular biophysics, and molecular & human genetics at Baylor College of Medicine. Lumpkin’s research focuses on genes, cells and neural signals that give rise to skin sensations such as touch, pain and itch. Dr. Lumpkin earned her BS in Animal Science from Texas Tech University and performed her PhD training at UT Southwestern Medical Center and The Rockefeller University. She completed her postdoctoral training at the University of Washington.
  13. neuronline_admin

    Demystifying the Academic Chalk Talk

    Chalk Talk Live Chat Of all the parts of the faculty job hiring process, the academic chalk talk can be the most mysterious. In this live chat, faculty members will discuss their experiences on both sides of the hiring committee, and will answer your questions about preparing, giving, and evaluating academic chalk talks. Whether you’re a postdoc or graduate student preparing to go on the job market or a faculty member sitting on a hiring committee, this live chat is relevant for you. Participants are encouraged to submit questions in advance of the live chat in the discussion thread below. You may direct questions to specific facilitators by tagging their usernames: @arianna_maffei @constanza.cortes @farran_briggs @xiong Related resources: Video and Q&A: Your Chalk Talk Questions Answered Webinar On-demand: Demystifying the Academic Chalk Talk Facilitators Arianna Maffei, PhD Arianna Maffei is an associate professor in the department of neurobiology and behavior at State University of New York (SUNY) - Stony Brook, where her research focuses on understanding how experience and learning modulate neural circuit connectivity and function. Maffei earned her PhD in physiology and biophysics from the University of Pavia in Italy and completed her postdoctoral training at Brandeis University. Constanza J. Cortes, PhD Constanza Cortes is an assistant professor in the department of neurology at the Duke University School of Medicine, where her research focuses on the relationship between autophagy and cellular clearance in skeletal muscle and proteostasis in the nervous system during aging. Cortes earned her PhD in neuroscience from the University of Chicago and completed her postdoctoral training and was a project scientist at the University of California, San Diego. Farran Briggs, PhD Farran Briggs is an associate professor in the department of neuroscience and the Ernest J. Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at the University of Rochester School of Medicine. Her research focuses on understanding how visual information is encoded by early visual circuits and how cognitive factors, such as attention, alter the way visual information is encoded in these circuits. She earned her PhD in biology from the University of California, San Diego and completed her postdoctoral training at the University of California, Davis. Qiaojie Xiong, PhD Qiaojie Xiong is an assistant professor at Stony Brook University in the department of neurobiology and behavior. She received her undergraduate degree in biological science from the University of Science and Technology of China and her PhD in physiology from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Following that, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Her lab is focused on understanding how thalamostriatal and corticostriatal pathways are involved in auditory decision making.
  14. Join the ECPA Live Chat | December 5, 12:00 PM ET In this live chat, you’ll learn more about the SfN Early Career Policy Ambassadors Program, a year-long program for early career scientists interested in science policy and advocacy. Hear from SfN’s Grassroots Advocacy Specialist as well as current and former ECPAs about the application process and their experiences in the program. Learn more about the ECPA Program. Facilitators Adam M. Katz Adam Katz is a Grassroots Advocacy Specialist at the Society for Neuroscience. He previously was a Policy and Advocacy Specialist at Research!America. Katz’s main research interests lie in neural plasticity. He received his undergraduate degree in Brain and Cognitive Science from the University of Rochester and his Master’s in Policy and Advocacy from Georgetown University. Ellen Wann, PhD Ellen Wann is a neuroscience advocacy fellow at the Society for Neuroscience. She was previously a PhD student in the Department of Neurobiology and Behavior at the University of California, Irvine and a 2016 Society for Neuroscience Early Career Policy Ambassador. Wann’s doctoral research focused on studying brain activity and blood flow changes after stroke. She received her bachelors in neuroscience and statistics from St. Olaf College and her PhD from the University of California, Irvine. Related resources Community Live Chat with Michael Heintz, SfN Advocacy Director Becoming an Early Career Ambassador (webcast) The Power of a Good Anecdote: Lessons From SfN’s 2017 Hill Day What I Learned at SfN’s Capitol Hill Day The Undergraduate Influence: Strategies to Get Involved in Science Policy
  15. On March 30 at 2 p.m. EDT, Maria Neimark Geffen, PhD, will answer your questions about how to advance in your academic career and excel in neuroscience. An assistant professor of otorhinolaryngology at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Neimark Geffen has built up her first laboratory over the past five years. By learning new skills and approaches, she has managed to balance her professional and personal priorities. She discussed her story at Neuroscience 2015 during the Celebration of Women in Neuroscience luncheon, which you can watch here. In this Q&A, you’ll have the opportunity to seek advice on what can help you, too, achieve your goals. So get your questions ready and post them here on March 30 at 2 p.m. to take part in this members-only chat! If you can’t join, post your questions now and check back after for an answer.
  16. Join the #SfN17 Live Chat | October 17th at 12:00 p.m. EDT Whether you are an annual meeting veteran or you are attending for the first time, proper planning is key to a successful experience. From lectures and poster sessions to professional development workshops and the Grad School Fair, this live chat will showcase the different types of learning and networking opportunities at the meeting. On October 17th from 12-1 p.m. EDT, facilitators will discuss tips on: Understanding different types of events Taking advantage of professional development and networking opportunities Planning your schedule in advance Participants are encouraged to submit questions in advance of the live chat in the discussion thread below. You are also welcome to direct your questions to specific facilitators by tagging their usernames: @Marguerite @heimanchow @Alexandra Facilitators: Marguerite Matthews, PhD Marguerite Matthews is a 2016-2018 AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the National Institutes of Health. She previously worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the Oregon Health and Science University. Matthews’s main interests lie in programs and policies impacting the biomedical research workforce. She earned her BS in biochemistry from Spelman College and her PhD in neuroscience from the University of Pittsburgh. Kim Heiman CHOW, PhD Kim Chow is a research assistant professor in Prof. Karl Herrup’s laboratory at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. She is currently a volunteer of both the Trainee Advisory Committee and Trainee Professional Development Award Selection Committee of Society for Neuroscience. Kim’s research focuses on unveiling the molecular and cellular mechanisms behind neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease and Ataxia telangiectasia. She earned her PhD in medicine and pharmacology from the University of Hong Kong and her first postdoctoral training in biomedical engineering form the Cornell University. She is currently an Alzheimer’s Association research fellow, a fellow at the neuro-technology and brain science council of the World Economic Forum and a junior fellow of the institute for advanced study at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Alexandra Colón-Rodriguez, Ph.D. Alexandra Colón-Rodriguez is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California Davis. She holds a dual major Ph.D. in Comparative Medicine and Integrative Biology, and Environmental Toxicology from Michigan State University. She obtained her bachelor’s degree in microbiology from Universidad del Este-Carolina, Puerto Rico. Colón-Rodriguez graduate research in the lab of Dr. William Atchison focused in understanding the toxicity of an environmental neurotoxicant, methylmercury, on spinal cord motor neurons. Currently, her postdoctoral research in Dr. Megan Dennis lab is using zebrafish as a model to characterize epilepsy and autism spectrum disorder candidate genes that are involved in synaptic function. Related content: How to Plan for SfN’s Annual Meeting as a Trainee (Sample Agenda) Neuronline’s Advice for SfN’s Annual Meeting Collection Annual Meeting Resources for Trainees
  17. Join the Live Chat August 10th at 12:00 p.m. EDT Time spent on applying for grants is on the rise, and many SfN members have also expressed uncertainty about the future of neuroscience funding in the United States. On August 10, from 12:00 - 1:00 p.m. EDT, Michael Heintz, SfN’s director of advocacy, will host a live chat in the Neuronline Community to answer members’ questions regarding the federal budget and its potential impact on NIH and NSF grants. During the live chat, Michael and his team will also answer member questions related to SfN’s advocacy efforts and the best approaches members can take for communicating with elected officials. Members are encouraged to submit questions for Michael (@mheintz) in advance of the live chat in the discussion thread below. Facilitator: Michael Heintz, Director of Advocacy, Society for Neuroscience Michael Heintz is the Director of Advocacy at the Society for Neuroscience. He previously was a program manager with the Maryland Energy Administration and Association of Public Health Laboratories, and before that practiced law in Ohio. He received his undergraduate degree in Environmental Science from Purdue University and his JD and MS in environmental science from Indiana University. Link back to Neuronline page
  18. Neurobiology of Disease Webinar and Live Chat Our understanding of the cell biology of mitochondria has exploded in the last decade, providing a renewed understanding of their contribution to neurological diseases ranging from pediatric encephalomyopathies to Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s, and others. Select faculty from the 2016 Neurobiology of Disease Workshop will continue the discussion, emphasizing mitochondrial motility and neurodegeneration, mitochondrial function in Alzheimer ’s disease, and the role of mitochondria in immunity and links to neuroinflammation. After the scientific presentations, join all the speakers here in the Neuronline Community for a live chat. Post your questions for the speakers in the replies below. * In the live chat: Heidi McBride, PhD, professor and Canada Research Chair in Mitochondrial Cell Biology at McGill University Eric Schon, PhD, Lewis P. Rowland Professor of Neurology in genetics and development at Columbia University Medical Center Xinnan Wang, PhD, assistant professor of neurosurgery at Stanford University School of Medicine Phillip West, PhD, assistant professor of microbial pathogenesis and immunology at Texas A&M University Health Science Center Watch the Webinar: Tuesday, July 18th at 1:00pm (EDT) Register now Join the Live Chat: Tuesday, July 18th at 1:45pm (EDT) right here in the Neuronline Community Can’t attend live? Register to watch on-demand. Link back to webinar *Current and inactive SfN members log in using SfN.org information. non-SfN members create a new account. Want to learn more about neurobiology of disease? Register now for the 2017 Neurobiology of Disease Workshop: Gene Therapy to Address Unmet Needs in Neurology, organized by Xandra Breakefield and Florian Eichler.
  19. neuronline_admin

    Getting the Most Out of the Annual Meeting

    Whether you are an annual meeting veteran, or you are attending for the first time, proper planning is key to a successful experience. From lectures and poster sessions to professional development workshops and the NeuroJobs Career Center, this webinar and live chat will showcase the different types of learning and networking opportunities at the meeting. This webinar on November 2 from 3-4 p.m. EDT will discuss tips on: Understanding different types of events Taking advantage of professional development and networking opportunities Planning your schedule in advance If you feel more comfortable asking your questions anonymously during the live chat from 4-4:30 p.m. EDT following the webinar, you may do so by clicking your account’s round avatar icon in the upper right hand corner and selecting the “Enter Anonymous Mode” iconin the drop-down menu. During the live chat, you are also welcome to direct your questions to specific speakers by tagging their usernames: @Elisabeth_VanBockstaele @ajstavnezer @Biancajmarlin. Link back to webinar
  20. With different opportunities and environments in academia, industry, and government, how can neuroscientists determine the right career path for them? Understanding what to expect in each field can help you make informed choices that lead to satisfaction and success whether you are just starting out or transitioning later in your career. Join SfN tomorrow at 3pm EST for a webinar titled Making the Switch: Tips for Successfully Transitioning Between Academia, Industry, and Government, in which various speakers will showcase the unique characteristics of each workplace and share advice on what to consider when contemplating a career move based on their own transitions. Right after the panel discussion, a special live chat with the webinar speakers will happen right here in the Neuronline community so they can take your career path questions. Click here to post your questions in advance.This webinar and live chat are open to all SfN members. Not a member? Join or renew your membership today. Link back to webinar
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