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  1. The application period for the 2021 Yale Ciencia Academy (YCA) for Professional Development has recently opened. The YCA for Professional Development is an NIH-funded (1R25GM114000) program that equips grad students with the knowledge, skills, and networks they need to find great postdoctoral positions that will further their academic interests and career goals. The program is open to doctoral students in the life and behavioral sciences in the final 1-2 years of their programs who are conducting research in areas funded by the National Institutes of Health. We are particularly interested in reaching students who identify as being from underrepresented backgrounds in science, as defined by the NIH. Students can expect the following key benefits: Networking with accomplished scientists, leaders, and peers from diverse backgrounds Training from leading experts to improve planning, mentoring and communication skills Personalized materials for the PhD to postdoc transition, including an Individual Postdoc Transition Plan, a list of potential postdoc labs, a well-crafted personal narrative for introductory emails and networking, a peer-reviewed research abstract, and a polished 20-minute scientific talk. Expert advice and notes from mock postdoc interviews All-expenses paid travel to Yale for an in-person meeting in June 2022 (2021 meeting converted to virtual format on account of COVID-19) Joining our YCA alumni network (>200 peers), with access to sample fellowships and professional opportunity announcements Bringing new resources to their lab and institution through the optional participation of their research advisor in our YCA Advisor Training YCA collaborates with iBiology and leverages CienciaPR, a large and diverse Latino/Hispanic scientific network. The application period closes March 31, 2021, and the program runs from June 2021 to June 2022. Application requirements, selection criteria, FAQs, and the application form can be accessed via this link: http://www.cienciapr.org/yca 247391335_YCA_2021_Flyer11.pdf
  2. https://neuronline.sfn.org/professional-development/career-skills-toolkit-from-phd-to-postdoc
  3. Are you interested in giving back to the LATP? SfN is currently seeking webinar presenters for the 2020-2021 LATP! If you have a preference for a specific topic, we are open to suggestions. If you are not sure of a topic but want to present a webinar, you can select from the topic list below. Don't see the topic you're looking for? We're open to suggestions so please let us know! Topic List Obtaining a PhD or postdoc abroad Community and academic partnerships Research collaborations – challenges and solutions Dealing with conflict in the lab Overcoming funding challenges as a postdoc What is a webinar and how is it different from a live chat? A webinar is a formal presentation which is recorded in advance and released for participants to watch on demand. A webinar Q&A session is typically held in the weeks following a webinar's release. Holding the Q&A session in the weeks following, rather than immediately after a live webinar event, allows more participants the opportunity to watch the recording and more time to develop questions or remarks. Participants are only able to interact with the presenter during the Q&A, not during the recording. A live chat is an informal conversation between the discussion leader(s) and audience. The live chat leader introduces a topic to the audience and then generates a discussion. Leaders generate engagement by posing open-ended questions and sharing experience and resources. Participants respond by asking questions or posting comments. Participants are able to interact with the leader as well as the other participants during the chat. Live chats are hosted in the LATP Community group under the Live Chats tab. Live chats on Community are completely text-based, like a continuous chatroom. They are meant to be ongoing discussions where participants can return and add to the conversation. Though webinars are typically followed by a Q&A session, webinar Q&As are focused on answering specific questions rather than having a two-way dialogue as described in the live chat experience.
  4. Are you interested in giving back to the LATP? SfN is currently seeking live chat discussion leaders for the 2020-2021 LATP! If you have a preference for a specific topic, we are open to suggestions. If you are not sure of a topic but want to lead a live chat discussion, you can select from the topic list below. Don't see the topic you're looking for? We're open to suggestions so please let us know! Topic List Personal and professional challenges in research collaborations Overcoming challenges (particularly funding challenges) of being a postdoctoral researcher in home country and abroad How to prepare to get a PhD or postdoc position outside home country Time management / managing time between writing and experiments Mental health in academia Career planning Tips for working from home when you can’t be in the lab Managing stress and anxiety / coping with research and professional goals How to negotiate with your PI Dealing with conflict in the lab Finding your niche within your field of work Dealing with vanity in academia What is expected to be written in a proposal/grant request What is a live chat and how is it different from a webinar? A live chat is an informal conversation between the discussion leader(s) and audience. The live chat leader introduces a topic to the audience and then generates a discussion. Leaders generate engagement by posing open-ended questions and sharing experience and resources. Participants respond by asking questions or posting comments. Participants are able to interact with the leader as well as the other participants during the chat. Live chats are hosted in the LATP Community group under the Live Chats tab. Live chats on Community are completely text-based, like a continuous chatroom. They are meant to be ongoing discussions where participants can return and add to the conversation. A webinar is a formal presentation which is recorded in advance and released for participants to watch on demand. Though a webinar Q&A session is typically held in the weeks following a webinar's release, participants only interact with the guest, not with each other. Webinar Q&As are focused on answering specific questions rather than having a two-way dialogue as described in the live chat experience.
  5. Neuroscience Training: Developing a Nimble and Versatile Workforce— A Virtual Workshop Series Topic # 1: Racial Justice, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Neuroscience Training About this Workshop: Racial justice, diversity, equity, and inclusion are critical issues that cross all aspects of neuroscience training and have tremendous implications for trainees, mentors, and the future of the field. This virtual workshop, the first in a series, will provide personal experiences on the training process and explore how institutions are approaching these areas to bring about positive change and also features notable SfN members, including current SfN president, Barry Everitt. For more information about this webinar and the workshop training series, download the attached PDF.NAS Diversity Webinar.pdf
  6. PURPOSE Grass Fellowships at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, USA, support investigator-designed, independent research projects by scientists early in their career. Supported approaches include neurophysiology, biophysics, integrative neurobiology, neuroethology, neuroanatomy, neuropharmacology, systems neuroscience, cellular and developmental neurobiology, and computational approaches to neural systems. The Foundation also has a longstanding interest in epilepsy-related research. BENEFITS Grass Fellowships provide research support including laboratory space, animals, equipment and supplies for one summer at the MBL. Additionally, the investigator, his/her spouse or legal domestic partner, and dependent children are provided housing, a daily meal allowance and round-trip travel to the MBL. Fellows function as an intellectual and social group within the MBL scientific community while sharing space in the Grass Laboratory. In a weekly private seminar series, eminent investigators at the MBL discuss their work with the Fellows. In addition, a yearly Forbes Lecturer will spend a portion of the summer in the Grass Lab interacting with Fellows. Child care benefits are available and supported by the Foundation. ELIGIBILITY Early investigators (late stage predoctoral trainees and beyond) are eligible to apply. This includes applicants with prior experience at MBL or with the Grass Foundation (MBL course alumni are encouraged to apply). Priority is given to applicants with a demonstrated commitment to pursuing a research career. Please see FAQ page on website or contact the Program Coordinator for more information. International Fellows (i.e., not US citizens or resident aliens) must hold a valid visa (e.g. J-1, H-1B, F1 or F1-OPT) for the entire duration of the fellowship. Please contact us early in case you need to adjust your visa status! The Grass Foundation values diversity in all of its programs. Learn more and apply! https://grassfoundation.org/fellowship-overview
  7. The Stanford Social Neuroscience Lab has put together a summer professional development series for undergraduates and recent grads in psychology/neuroscience that are interested in careers in academia. The free, virtual workshops are intended for students from backgrounds that are underrepresented in higher education. Students can register here. Download a flyer: SSNL Prof Dev_ Summer 2020 Flier.pdf
  8. "As a postdoc, you've likely had several mentors you can point to who have shaped your career path. You may be at a point where you're also starting to become a mentor. Through networking, @Shawn Bates, a postdoc in Seema Bhatnagar's lab at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), has met mentors who have introduced him to opportunities and from whom he's taken inspiration for mentoring others. He has also received a Postdoctoral Fellowship for Academic Diversity at CHOP, which aims to increase the diversity of the community of scholars devoted to academic research there and at the University of Pennsylvania..." Read the full article: How to Find Mentors and Be a Mentor as a Postdoc Written by 2018-2020 NSP Fellow @Shawn Bates
  9. "As a postdoc, you've likely had several mentors you can point to who have shaped your career path. You may be at a point where you're also starting to become a mentor. Through networking, @Shawn Bates, a postdoc in Seema Bhatnagar's lab at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), has met mentors who have introduced him to opportunities and from whom he's taken inspiration for mentoring others. He has also received a Postdoctoral Fellowship for Academic Diversity at CHOP, which aims to increase the diversity of the community of scholars devoted to academic research there and at the University of Pennsylvania..." Read the full article: How to Find Mentors and Be a Mentor as a Postdoc Written by 2018-2020 Neuroscience Scholars Program (NSP) Fellow @Shawn Bates
  10. Amanda Labuza

    First Day of Post-Doc

    My first day of work will be in a lab I have never seen, and I have no idea what to expect. How do you start a new job during a pandemic? If you followed my dissertation writing blog, you know I graduated at the very beginning of the COVID-19 quarantine. Luckily, I was still able to get a post-doc position during this time. Unfortunately, because of the pandemic I wasn't able to do an on site interview, so while the people were great when I met them at the SfN conference, I don't really know much about this position. Anyone have any advice? What is it like to transition from grad student to post-doc? Has anyone else had new people recently join their lab? How have you been able to train them with most labs working at limited capacity? Any advice is appreciated.
  11. American Psychological Foundation Apply online for all programs here: https://www.grantinterface.com/Home/Logon?urlkey=apa& FAQ: https://www.apa.org/apf/funding/grants/faqs Questions? Email APF’s program coordinator, Julia, at jwatson@apa.org . Download a flyer with all information: APF July Program Announcement.pdf Upcoming Deadlines Marian R. Stuart Grant: $20,000 Due: July 1, 2020 Up to $20,000 to further the research, practice, or education of an early career psychologist on the connection between mental and physical health, particularly for work that contributes to public health. More information: https://www.apa.org/apf/funding/stuart-grant David H. and Beverly A. Barlow Grant: $8,500 Due: September 15, 2020 Up to $8,500 to support innovative basic and clinical research on anxiety and anxiety related disorders. More information: https://www.apa.org/apf/funding/barlow APF/ Division 39 Grant: $6,000 New due date: September 15, 2020 $6,000 to support efforts in education, research and service that advance and aencourage the field of psychoanalysis. The Div. 39 grant now focuses on programs or projects that increase the public’s awareness of the benefits of psychoanalytic principles or treatments. Special consideration will be given this year to research in the area of the pandemic and COVID-19. More information: https://www.apa.org/apf/funding/division-39 Bruce and Jane Walsh Grant in Memory of John Holland: $15,000 Due: September 15, 2020 $15,000 to support the investigation of how personality, culture and environment influence work behavior and health. More information: https://www.apa.org/apf/funding/walsh Steven O. Walfish Grants: $2,000 Due: September 30, 2020 Up to two $2,000 grants are available to graduate students and/or early career psychologists (within 10 years of earning the doctoral degree). More information: https://www.apa.org/apf/funding/walfish Now Accepting Proposals APF/ Division 37 Diane J. Willis Early Career Award: $2,000 Due: January 31, 2021 $2,000 to support talented young psychologists making contributions towards informing, advocating for and improving the mental health and well-being of children and families particularly through policy. More information: https://www.apa.org/apf/funding/div-37-willis APF/ Division 29 Early Career Award: $1,000 Due: January 31, 2021 $1,000 to recognize promising contributions to psychotherapy, psychology and Div. 29 (Society for the Advancement of Psychotherapy) by a division member with 10 or fewer years of postdoctoral experience. More information: https://www.apa.org/apf/funding/div-29 Walter Katkovsky Scholarships: $5,000 Due: February 1, 2021 Up to nine $5,000 scholarships are offered annually for first-year students enrolled in APA designated programs in psychopharmacology. More information: https://www.apa.org/apf/funding/katkovsky Walter Katkovsky Research Grants: $20,000 Due: February 1, 2021 The Walter Katkovsky Research Grants support research on the general topic of combining psychotherapy with a psychoactive substance that may be an over-the-counter or other legal substance or a prescription medication, where the substance is an adjunct to the psychotherapy and not the primary intervention. More information: https://www.apa.org/apf/funding/katkovsky-research-grants
  12. The annual call for applicants for the Next Generation Leader Council is now open and will close June 12, 2020. The council fosters the development of emerging leaders in neuroscience and recognizes the importance of fresh and innovative contributions from scientists at early stages in their careers. This program continues through the recent and future evolution of the Allen Institute for Brain Science as outlined in its recent press release. The Allen Institute for Brain Science’s mission is to accelerate the understanding of how the human brain works in health and disease. Using big science, team science and open science approaches, they generate useful public resources, drive technological and analytical advances, and discover fundamental brain properties through integration of open-ended and hypothesis-driven research and free public dissemination of our data. Since its inception, the Allen Institute for Brain Science has sought the advice and feedback of esteemed scientists through program-specific advisory councils. The Next Generation Leaders form a complementary group of advisors, bringing fresh and forward-looking perspectives, and will continue to interact with both the Cell Types and MindScope programs over the coming years. The Allen Institute is seeking exceptional candidates to join the council. A Next Generation Leader may be selected from any basic scientific, biomedical, or technological field, but must be passionate about understanding the complex problems facing brain research today. Candidates should have demonstrated innovation and have potentially transformative research programs or ideas. They welcome diverse candidates whose experience in research, teaching, and outreach has prepared them to contribute to our commitment to making a broad, inclusive scientific impact. Requirements are (1) a PhD and/or MD in a relevant field; (2) currently in a post-doctoral position, or began as an Assistant Professor on or after 6/12/2018 (or the equivalent level in industry). Detailed information and application instructions are available on this website. The application deadline is June 12, 2020. If you have questions or need additional information, please contact NextGen@alleninstitute.org. Thank you in advance for your candidate suggestions and support. Next Generation Leaders Council at the Allen Institute 2020.pdf
  13. We are two months into quarantine in the US and looking back, and for many of us it doesn't seem like we accomplished as much as we thought we would. With all this "extra" time we were supposed to write all those papers, submit that grant, finish analyzing all that data, workout every day, and learn to bake bread. Instead, every day felt like a struggle to be productive. Of course you are struggling to be productive working from home. Most of us do not work from home. In fact, one of the few chances we have at work-life balance is the fact that most of our work can't be done at home. We are used to physically separating work and home. More than that, we are not used to sitting at a desk for long hours. Unless you routinely do dry bench work, we are much more adapt to short periods of work. You write a paragraph while you let the gel run, and then get up and set up a transfer, and then check an email while your buffer mixes, and then read for an hour while you eat lunch, etc. We are great at breaking up tasks and fitting each piece into small chunks of time in between other tasks. We are usually getting up and moving to a seminar, moving to a journal club, to a meeting, our days are always broken up. But now, we are supposed to just sit at your desk at home for 8 hours and write straight. Or read papers without breaks. And it doesn't work. But of course it doesn't. If you were good at sitting and focusing on one task for hours at end, you would have gone into computer programming. But you didn't. So without a hard deadline, you shouldn't expect yourself to be motivate to read every paper on calcium regulation in astrocytes in a week. So if you are anxious about your boss asking you why you weren't "more productive" take a breath. Very few of us were. Keep in mind, there is no new data coming in for awhile, even after we re-enter the labs, and PIs get lost without new data to look at. It isn't personal. It doesn't make you a bad student. You were not alone. The goal of quarantine was never to be "productive". It was to protect society and to literally survive a pandemic. This was never a vacation, but it also wasn't designed to be a chance to write all those manuscripts. Writing, data analysis, literature searches, whatever you've been filling your time with it, it was a meant to help keep working going so it didn't completely stop. As long as you did more than nothing, you were successful. Keep working, but don't beat yourself up if you didn't accomplish as much as you thought you would during this time. NOTE: This is all assuming you don't have children. If you have children, forget it. I can't even imagine what you are going through right now. I just want to say remember to apologize to every stay at home parent for their constant work.
  14. Latin American Training Program 2020 Call for Applications April 8–May 13 The Latin American Training Program (LATP) supports the professional and scientific development of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who are citizens or permanent residents of a Latin American or Caribbean country. LATP is jointly funded with generous support from The Grass Foundation, the International Brain Research Organization (IBRO), SfN, and the annual host institution. All eligible applicants will be invited to become LATP Associates. Fifteen trainees will also be selected as Fellows to participate in a three-week course at the División de Neurociencias at Instituto de Investigaciones Biológicas Clemente Estable (IIBCE) in Montevideo, from November 2–20, 2020. The course topic, “Molecules, Cells and Circuits: Understanding Nervous System Mechanisms”, will bring together top faculty from around the world to provide participants with high-quality lectures, lab exercises, and training on vital professional development topics. LATP Fellows also receive a travel stipend to attend Neuroscience 2021. As an Associate you will have access to: • An online community of neuroscience faculty and peers from across the region. • A rich library of educational and professional development resources. • Web events designed to enhance training led by neuroscience faculty. Eligibility • Citizen or permanent resident of a Latin American or Caribbean country. • Enrolled in a graduate degree-granting program or postdoctoral fellowship in the region. • Bilingual in English. • Provide a CV, letter of recommendation, and brief personal essay (all in English). For more information and to apply, visit www.sfn.org/latp Questions? Email globalaffairs@sfn.org Download a flyer: 2020 LATP Application Flyer.pdf
  15. Early Career Researchers (ECRs) can apply to participate in the IBRO/PERC sponsored Young Investigator Training Programme (YITP) that will be organised by the British Neuroscience Association (BNA) Host Society Committee (HSC), with 2-3 week placements in host laboratories around the UK prior to the FENS Forum in Glasgow. As part of the programme, the selected researchers will have the opportunity to work within defined research environments in the UK in order to get familiarised with different facilities and techniques in neuroscience, as well as expanding their research network. A limited number of slots are available. Applications should be submitted using the form available below. The deadline for submissions is Monday 16 March 2020 (23:59 GMT). Applications and supporting documents should be submitted to the BNA office (office@bna.org.uk). In your application, please list your first, second, and third choice of laboratories. A list of available placements is on the program website. Full information about the programme can be found here.
  16. NIH ORWH Science Policy Scholar Travel Award for the Organization for the Study of Sex Differences (OSSD) 2020 Annual Meeting in Marina del Rey, CA For more information, including eligibility criteria, please click here ABOUT THE AWARD The NIH ORWH Science Policy Scholar Travel Awards will support the development of two junior investigators who are focused on women’s health or sex and gender differences and are also interested in research policy by helping to defray the cost of attending the Organization for the Study of Sex Differences’ (OSSD) annual meeting on May 4–7, 2020, in Marina del Rey, CA. ORWH requests that interested investigators submit an abstract on a policy-related matter connected to women’s health or sex and gender differences for consideration as a poster, oral session, or symposium at the OSSD 2020 Annual Meeting. A panel of experts will review the abstracts, and the authors of the two chosen will receive the travel awards. Attendance at the OSSD meeting will be a unique opportunity for investigators to network with leading scientists and clinicians working to advance sex and gender inclusion and policy. AWARD AMOUNT Two ORWH awards of up to $3,000 will be available to support the travel of the selected NIH ORWH Science Policy Scholars, whose OSSD abstracts on women’s health or sex and gender differences policy will have been accepted for a poster, oral session, or symposium at the OSSD 2020 Annual Meeting. APPLICATION AND AWARD TIMELINE • The application period ends February 3, 2020. • The award recipients will be announced March 13, 2020. The individuals will be notified via email. WHO CAN APPLY? Eligibility requirements for the NIH ORWH Science Policy Scholar Travel Award are: Must possess a baccalaureate or higher degree, be a medical student from any health-related discipline, be a postdoctoral trainee, be an American Association for the Advancement of Science fellow, be a medical resident, be a member of the uniformed services or National Guard or be an investigator who is no more than 5 years past doctoral degree or residency. Must be the first author on the submitted OSSD abstract for presentation. Cannot be a Federal employee. Investigators from underrepresented populations are encouraged to apply. HOW TO APPLY Applicants are encouraged to submit abstracts related to research policies relevant to women’s health or sex and gender differences. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Studies of the effects of such policies in promoting the research; (2) Identification of policy gaps that might promote such research and projection of their effects; and (3) Identification of specific research disciplines and/or research topic areas where more work is needed to promote women’s health and sex and gender differences. For more information, including eligibility criteria, please click here DOWNLOAD A FLYER BELOW ORWH_rebrand_OSSD Travel Award 2020 CA flyer.pdf
  17. Amanda Labuza

    The Value of Female Advisors

    Recently I have been struggling with finishing my PhD. The pressures to find a job, stressful committee meetings, writing, trying to get that last experiment done, etc. And I have realized how helpful it is to have female advisors. I don't have any female PIs on my committee, haven't collaborated with any, and haven't really had many classes with female PIs either. But this last week I met with two for various reasons and I am suddenly wishing I would have built these relationships a lot sooner. Speaking with women PIs has been very uplifting. They managed to help me go from completely overwhelmed to putting it all back into perspective. Maybe it is because they were a little less blunt, a little less harsh about some of the issues I was having. Maybe it was because they took the time to say "I know it is upsetting, but these are just small obstacles to get to the end." Or maybe it was because they weren't on my committee and were just removed from the situation. Either way, helped. There is a certain validation is speaking female-to-female about certain struggles. Occasionally there are still sexist comments I have to bear. I'm not saying they are all the time and worth reporting. But just the occasional side comment from my advisor that "it's your two x chromosomes" stopping you from standing up for yourself just frustrate me. I know he was trying to encourage me to advocate for myself and not to be a typical timid female, but did we really need to bring gender into it? But it was relieving to hear from someone in authority "that comment doesn't sit well with me either". Just the reassurance that I'm not being overly sensitive. And the simultaneous reassurance that it is okay to be sensitive. To hear they cried during their PhD too, but they still managed to become PIs. It gives me hope I can do it too. This isn't to say men can't cry during their PhDs too. Of course you can. And it isn't to say male advisors can't be inspiring or supportive. I'm just saying there is something special in getting to speak with someone with shared experiences. And occasionally someone with more tact than certain cranky PIs (male or female). To all the wonderful women out there, creating an awesome example for young scientists like myself, thank you. You are an inspiration. I should have learned the value of speaking with you earlier. And to all the young female grad students, go make friends with a female professor. They don't need to be your formal advisor to help mentor you through this still male dominated field.
  18. The Department of Psychology at Cornell University seeks to hire an Associate or Full Professor from any area of Psychology. Applicants must have a distinguished record of scholarly impact and preference will be given to candidates with the potential to serve in a leadership capacity in the Department in the future. Review of applications will begin October 1, 2019 and continue until the position is filled. Applicants must upload into Academic Jobs online at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/14149 a cover letter, curriculum vitae, along with a list of the applicant’s five most impactful publications and a brief statement of teaching interests. Confidential letters of recommendation may be solicited at a later date. Diversity and Inclusion are a part of Cornell University’s heritage. The College of Arts and Sciences at Cornell embraces diversity and seeks candidates who will create a climate that attracts students and faculty of all races, nationalities, and genders. We strongly encourage women and underrepresented minorities to apply. Cornell University is a recognized EEO/AA employer and educator, valuing AA/EEO, Protected Veterans, and Individuals with Disabilities. Information about the Psychology Department at Cornell can be found at https://psychology.cornell.edu/ Download a flyer here: 2019-20 Cornell Psychology Faculty Search Description.docx (14.1 KB)
  19. This live chat was led by Dr. Silmara de Lima, a postdoctoral researcher at Benowitz Lab (Children’s Hospital - Harvard University), who discussed how to land a position abroad (outside of Latin America). She has been investigating regeneration of axons in the central nervous system (CNS) since 2007 when she started her Master in Brazil, and pursued this topic during her PhD training as well, which was begun in Brazil and continued at Boston Children’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School. Dr. Lima was joined by Victor Fattori, MSc (wrapping up his PhD), from Londrina State University - Department of Pathology, Parana - Brazil. He did part of his PhD training at Boston Children’s Hospital - Harvard Medical School. He works with the pharmacology of pain and already got a position here for his post doc and will come back as soon as he finishes his PhD. View a recording of this live chat here Download the PowerPoint presentation - LATP - How to land a position abroad (outside Latin America).pptx (1.4 MB) SfN International Resources and Awards.pdf (107.6 KB) Dr. Silmara de Lima - Silmara.DeLima@childrens.harvard.edu Victor Fattori, MSc - vfattori@uel.br
  20. There is a bill in the state of Maryland right now to make it legal for graduate students to form a union. If it passes, our student body will be voting on whether to form a union or not. Currently we have quarterly meetings between a small group of graduate students and the administration. I’m curious if other students have unions. Have they been helpful? What is your experience? I appreciate any input!
  21. The next LATP live chat will be held on Tuesday, February 12, 2019 from 1:00pm – 2:00pm (ET). Join Dr. Rita Balice-Gordon in a discussion over her paper Rigor or Mortis: Best Practices for Preclinical Research in Neuroscience which is attached below. Click here to register. *Rita Balice-Gordon - Rigor or Mortis- Best Practices for Preclinical Research in Neuroscience.pdf (563.9 KB) The next LATP webinar will be held in March 2019. Dr. Gregory Quirk, Chair of the Latin American Training Advisory Group (SfN) and University of Puerto Rico professor, will give a presentation over what makes a lab work for 20 years. Dr. Quirk will discuss his article Neuroscience Research and Mentoring in Puerto Rico: What Succeeds in This Environment which you can download here Gregory Quirk - Neuroscience Research and Mentoring in Puerto Rico.pdf (101.2 KB) . The date of this webinar, as well as the registration link, will be provided in the coming weeks. Additional resources for this webinar include: *NIH Press Release: Puerto Rico’s “fear lab” mentors neuroscience rigor amid diversity *NIMH YouTube video: Neuroscience Mentoring in Puerto Rico. Dr. Quirk and colleagues in the Laboratory of Fear Learning at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine celebrate 20th anniversary. *Blog discussion on the article “Neuroscience research and mentoring in Puerto Rico: What succeeds in this environment?” Applications now open for the Gordon Research Conference on the Cerebellum (July 14-19) in Switzerland. The main conference will be preceded by the 2-day Gordon Research Seminar (GRS), a pre-meeting that is organized and attended exclusively by graduate students and post-docs. Apply for the main conference and/or apply for the 2-day GRS. Applications close on June 16, 2019. Call for applications now open for travel awards to attend 2019 Japan Neuroscience Society (JNS) Meeting. SfN will provide five awards up to $2,000 to members from the United States, Canada, and Mexico to attend the Japan Neuroscience Society Meeting in Niigata, Japan, from July 25-28, 2019. Applications close February 1. Apply now! 2019 IBRO World Congress Travel Award call for applications closes April 22. The 10th IBRO World Congress will take place in Daegu, South Korea, September 21-25, 2019. SfN offers up to 15 travel awards in the amount of $2,000 each to support the participation of U.S., Canadian, and Mexican graduate students who have advanced to candidacy for a PhD or postdoctoral fellows at the IBRO World Congress, held every four years. For more information, visit our IBRO Awards Page. Scholarships available to attend the 4th International Symposium on Hypothalamic Hamartomas in Washington, DC. The Symposium is being presented by Hope for Hypothalamic Hamartomas and Children’s National Medical Center (CNMC) in Washington, DC on September 12-14, 2019. A limited number of scholarships are available for young investigators and new faculty with priority to underrepresented researchers/clinicians. Deadline to apply for scholarships is June 30, 2019. For more information and to register, click here Applications for the 2019-2020 LATP will open in the coming weeks. The 3-week live course will be hosted at the División de Neurociencias at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) in Mexico City, from August 26 to September 13, 2019. The course topic “Enlightening the Brain: The Use of Light to Understand the Function of the Nervous System” will bring together top faculty from around the world to provide participants with high-quality lectures, lab exercises, and training on vital professional development topics. Fifteen top candidates will be selected to participate in the 3-week live course and will receive a travel stipend to attend Neuroscience 2020. To extend the impact of the Research Centers Collaborative Network (RCCN), the RCCN will sponsor three webinars per year targeting early career faculty affiliated with the six Centers programs to build awareness regarding the collaborative resources available across the Centers programs. View RCCN webinars now. Neuronline often features written contributions by SfN members on key topics, such as professional development, career advice, career paths, outreach, advocacy, training, and diversity. If you’re interested in writing a short article about a facet of your career which includes advice for other SfN members, reach out to Meridian Watters at mwatters@sfn.org to share your article pitch and learn more about writing requirements. Click to view Dr. Nancy Padilla-Coreano’s article titled Five Ways I Navigated Grad School as a Minority.
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