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  1. I know there is a lot of information out there already on how to prepare for SfN’s annual meeting. The one starting in just 3 days! But the truth is, if you have never been to SfN before, you can’t really prepare for what you will experience. Over 30,000 people attend for 5 days. It is beyond overwhelming. So here is my major piece of advice, don’t over plan. You can’t do everything. That’s okay though, it is the point. There are so many specialized subcategories SfN has already curated itineraries for certain interests. Even then there will still be things they included you aren’t interested in or things they left out. So relax and don’t do too much. SfN is a chance to recharge your enthusiasm for science. We have spent all year grinding away trying to get publishable data. This is the time to share those discoveries and learn about others’ work. But you can’t recharge if you are stressing about getting to every talk, every poster, and every meeting. So pick what matters most and let the rest go. Make sure to leave some empty time in your schedule. There are hundreds of vendors giving away free swag and showing off the latest technology. Take some time to see what is there. You will be in sunny California. Take time to go for a walk along the water with your lab. Enjoy yourself. If you don’t make it to everything it will still be worth your time. Relax, have fun, and get excited. This is going to be a crazy whirlwind that will be over faster than you think. Can’t wait to see you in San Diego! Oh, and wear comfortable shoes. Walking from the first row of posters to the last is literally half a mile.
  2. Michael Oberdorfer

    Animals Panel

    Be sure to Attend the Animals in Research Panel on Monday, November 13th, Noon to 2PM, Room 103A. " How to effectively communicate your animal research"
  3. Join the #SfN17 Live Chat | October 17th at 12:00 p.m. EDT Whether you are an annual meeting veteran or you are attending for the first time, proper planning is key to a successful experience. From lectures and poster sessions to professional development workshops and the Grad School Fair, this live chat will showcase the different types of learning and networking opportunities at the meeting. On October 17th from 12-1 p.m. EDT, facilitators will discuss tips on: Understanding different types of events Taking advantage of professional development and networking opportunities Planning your schedule in advance Participants are encouraged to submit questions in advance of the live chat in the discussion thread below. You are also welcome to direct your questions to specific facilitators by tagging their usernames: @Marguerite @heimanchow @Alexandra Facilitators: Marguerite Matthews, PhD Marguerite Matthews is a 2016-2018 AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the National Institutes of Health. She previously worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the Oregon Health and Science University. Matthews’s main interests lie in programs and policies impacting the biomedical research workforce. She earned her BS in biochemistry from Spelman College and her PhD in neuroscience from the University of Pittsburgh. Kim Heiman CHOW, PhD Kim Chow is a research assistant professor in Prof. Karl Herrup’s laboratory at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. She is currently a volunteer of both the Trainee Advisory Committee and Trainee Professional Development Award Selection Committee of Society for Neuroscience. Kim’s research focuses on unveiling the molecular and cellular mechanisms behind neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease and Ataxia telangiectasia. She earned her PhD in medicine and pharmacology from the University of Hong Kong and her first postdoctoral training in biomedical engineering form the Cornell University. She is currently an Alzheimer’s Association research fellow, a fellow at the neuro-technology and brain science council of the World Economic Forum and a junior fellow of the institute for advanced study at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Alexandra Colón-Rodriguez, Ph.D. Alexandra Colón-Rodriguez is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California Davis. She holds a dual major Ph.D. in Comparative Medicine and Integrative Biology, and Environmental Toxicology from Michigan State University. She obtained her bachelor’s degree in microbiology from Universidad del Este-Carolina, Puerto Rico. Colón-Rodriguez graduate research in the lab of Dr. William Atchison focused in understanding the toxicity of an environmental neurotoxicant, methylmercury, on spinal cord motor neurons. Currently, her postdoctoral research in Dr. Megan Dennis lab is using zebrafish as a model to characterize epilepsy and autism spectrum disorder candidate genes that are involved in synaptic function. Related content: How to Plan for SfN’s Annual Meeting as a Trainee (Sample Agenda) Neuronline’s Advice for SfN’s Annual Meeting Collection Annual Meeting Resources for Trainees
  4. Greetings, I’m Ahmed Eljack, a Sudanese medical student and author of “Eljack’s Lecture Notes in Neuroscience”. I was planning to attend SfN Annual Meeting 2017 but I was surprised that I can’t get a visa due to the Executive Order which banned 7 countries’ nationals from entering the US. Is there any other affected persons in this forum? Regards
  5. neuronline_admin

    Getting the Most Out of the Annual Meeting

    Whether you are an annual meeting veteran, or you are attending for the first time, proper planning is key to a successful experience. From lectures and poster sessions to professional development workshops and the NeuroJobs Career Center, this webinar and live chat will showcase the different types of learning and networking opportunities at the meeting. This webinar on November 2 from 3-4 p.m. EDT will discuss tips on: Understanding different types of events Taking advantage of professional development and networking opportunities Planning your schedule in advance If you feel more comfortable asking your questions anonymously during the live chat from 4-4:30 p.m. EDT following the webinar, you may do so by clicking your account’s round avatar icon in the upper right hand corner and selecting the “Enter Anonymous Mode” iconin the drop-down menu. During the live chat, you are also welcome to direct your questions to specific speakers by tagging their usernames: @Elisabeth_VanBockstaele @ajstavnezer @Biancajmarlin. Link back to webinar
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