Jump to content
Andrew Chen

About the Science Knows No Borders program

Recommended Posts

Andrew Chen

20190321_SKNB-no-border.png

In keeping with the Society’s commitment to facilitate global collaboration in science, SfN has established the Science Knows No Borders (SKNB) program. Through this program, scientists who have been denied a U.S. travel visa to attend Neuroscience 2019 can share their research and engage with colleagues through poster, nanosymposium, symposium, and minisymposium sessions. Participants in the SKNB program will be available to answer questions about their presentations in this forum, which will be open October 19-23. Neuroscience 2019 attendees are encouraged to visit the forum while on-site to interact with SKNB participants.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Majid Khalili Ardali

Hello @Andrew Chen

Where do we have to post our welcome message ?

 

Edited by Majid Khalili Ardali

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Andrew Chen
45 minutes ago, Majid Khalili Ardali said:

Hello @Andrew Chen

Where do we have to post our welcome message ?

 

Hi @Majid Khalili Ardali! Please post your welcome message/topic in the SKNB forum area; navigate to that page and click "Start new topic".

For more details, please follow step 3 in this tutorial: sknb-instructions.docx

If you have other questions, feel free to message me 🙂

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Sabah Ul-Hasan

Hello,

I do bioinformatics. A colleague in neuroscience passed this along to me as one avenue for asking your thoughts on a topic that has been on my mind for several years -- I have friends, extended family, and colleagues affected by the US travel bans. I'm in the process of putting together a letter for which all self-identifying scientists can sign as a way of committing to their own personal and professional contributions to equity on this topic via a bullet list of passive and active actions to take.

To my knowledge, SfN is the only research conference to heavily consider and implement some solutions surrounding this topic. I would like to ask what additional steps are going to be taken in the upcoming conference, and ones that follow? This question also pertains to citizenship, and restrictions some may have with traveling as a result. As SfN is already leading the way (for which there is still much to be done, but at least it's something -- so, thank you!), to that end, in our current climate change crisis what will be our commitment as scientists to changing the paradigm of conferences (specifically travel/emissions) in the interest of environmental justice and practicing what we preach in the evidence we believe to be true (that humans are a major catalysis of climate change).

 

Many thanks for the consideration,

Sabah

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Andrew Chen
42 minutes ago, Guest Sabah Ul-Hasan said:

I do bioinformatics. A colleague in neuroscience passed this along to me as one avenue for asking your thoughts on a topic that has been on my mind for several years -- I have friends, extended family, and colleagues affected by the US travel bans. I'm in the process of putting together a letter for which all self-identifying scientists can sign as a way of committing to their own personal and professional contributions to equity on this topic via a bullet list of passive and active actions to take.

To my knowledge, SfN is the only research conference to heavily consider and implement some solutions surrounding this topic. I would like to ask what additional steps are going to be taken in the upcoming conference, and ones that follow? This question also pertains to citizenship, and restrictions some may have with traveling as a result. As SfN is already leading the way (for which there is still much to be done, but at least it's something -- so, thank you!), to that end, in our current climate change crisis what will be our commitment as scientists to changing the paradigm of conferences (specifically travel/emissions) in the interest of environmental justice and practicing what we preach in the evidence we believe to be true (that humans are a major catalysis of climate change).

Hello Sabah! Thank you for your comments and questions; you raise a very important notion of how science is a global endeavor, but due to political factors, can be limited in its efficacy.

To address your concerns about unnecessary travel and its harmful environmental effects, I believe that SfN is attempting to bridge these gaps by organizing Virtual Conferences, which garner viewership from all over the world! There is definitely more to done, but I think we're taking the right steps forward. 🙂

I'm interested to hear our SKNB presenters' thoughts on these matters. @Majid Khalili Ardali, @Azam Asgarihafshejani, @Shahrzad Ghazisaeidi, @Mohammad Abdolrahmani, @Sepideh Keshavarzi, @Dimple Jhonsa what do you think?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mohammad Abdolrahmani

I haven't thought of the US travel ban from this angle, as unnecessary travels that if avoided would help prevent climate change. In fact, the number of banned presenters is maybe less than 1% of the total participants to SfN. So it can't be that helpful. Yet I see the huge potential here. Provided all SfN presenters (junior, senior, famous, ordinary) devote some of their time to actively participate to virtual conferences (e.g. present their work online, engage in scientific discussions, etc), I believe most of the unnecessary travels could be avoided.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Sabah Ul-Hasan
On 9/20/2019 at 1:50 AM, Mohammad Abdolrahmani said:

I haven't thought of the US travel ban from this angle, as unnecessary travels that if avoided would help prevent climate change. In fact, the number of banned presenters is maybe less than 1% of the total participants to SfN. So it can't be that helpful. Yet I see the huge potential here. Provided all SfN presenters (junior, senior, famous, ordinary) devote some of their time to actively participate to virtual conferences (e.g. present their work online, engage in scientific discussions, etc), I believe most of the unnecessary travels could be avoided.

Very much agree, thank you for the thoughtfulness! Please keep me posted on how this year's meeting unfolds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sepideh Keshavarzi

Hi Andrew and SfN! First of all, I would like to say thank you very much for this initiative and for highlighting the issue this year. I really appreciate your effort. I would like to share my experience as a participant of the sknb program. Unfortunately, I did not gain anything out of this form of presentation. I did not get to hear what happened during my session, i.e. what other speakers talked about.  I had no opportunity to engage in a Q/A, and received no questions via emails or other forms of contacts. So basically, it was a lot of work to make this pre-recorded talk, but sadly no scientific or networking gain at the end. Therefore, in my experience, this did not compensate, even a tiny bit, for a full participation. Thank you again for your effort, however in this current format I cannot recommend it to others for future years.

Edited by Sepideh Keshavarzi
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mohammad Abdolrahmani
12 hours ago, Sepideh Keshavarzi said:

Hi Andrew and SfN! First of all, I would like to say thank you very much for this initiative and for highlighting the issue this year. I really appreciate your effort. I would like to share my experience as a participant of the sknb program. Unfortunately, I did not gain anything out of this form of presentation. I did not get to hear what happened during my session, i.e. what other speakers talked about.  I had no opportunity to engage in a Q/A, and received no questions via emails or other forms of contacts. So basically, it was a lot of work to make this pre-recorded talk, but sadly no scientific or networking gain at the end. Therefore, in my experience, this did not compensate, even a tiny bit, for a full participation. Thank you again for your effort, however in this current format I cannot recommend it to others for future years.

Same here, I got no questions despite the time I spent preparing. Yet I appreciate the effort taken to organize the SKNB online forum. Fortunately, my colleague 'physically' attended the conference and received useful comments.

Thanks to SKNB.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Majid Khalili Ardali

HI all,

I think SKNB program was a good starting point.

For me, it was the same as Mohammad and Sepideh have already mentioned. Though the idea of SKNB is really appreciated, with no feedback from any audience it really didn't bring much. I think for next events, the idea of presenting online (like streaming videos) in dedicated times might be a good solution. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Andrew Chen

Hey everyone! Thanks so much for this feedback, which will be provided to the SfN Program Committee. You will also receive a survey link soon asking for additional information so we can continue honing this program.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...